Archive for the ‘Chinese Herbs’ Category

Biological Rhythms from the Lens of Chinese Medicine

Saturday, January 26th, 2019 by Sharon Sherman

Blue light and insomnia How Blue Light Destroys Your Circadian Rhythms and Sleep Quality  The concept of Yin and Yang is deeply rooted in Classical Chinese medicine. Yin and yang are concepts around relationship. They establish a comparative and a continuum for creating a harmonious lifestyle between humans and our natural world. Human rhythms in […]

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Use of Chinese Cinnamon; Gui Zhi & Rou Gui in Herbal Medicine

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016 by Sharon Sherman

With Thanksgiving around the corner and a chill in the air, many of us are getting back in the kitchen to prepare warm, comforting food. Maybe you’re the type to spend hours perfecting a butternut squash soup recipe, or maybe you’ve just been eagerly anticipating the return of a certain cult coffee flavor. From muffins to […]

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Moxibustion Therapy: Uses & Benefits of Moxibustion

Thursday, October 13th, 2016 by Sharon Sherman

If you’ve spent any time researching Chinese medicine, you might have come across a therapy called moxibustion. In general, moxibustion doesn’t get as much press coverage as acupuncture or some Chinese herbal treatments, but this soothing technique has a wealth of health benefits – especially as an adjunct to regular acupuncture sessions. It may be worth […]

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Don’t Get Pins and Needles: Common Acupuncture Myths

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016 by Sharon Sherman

As Westerners, it’s understandable that we approach acupuncture and Chinese medicine treatments with some skepticism and lots of questions. Better to answer the questions and debunk the myths than to let misconceptions steer us away from a highly effective healing system that has been used to preserve health and promote healing for thousands of years. […]

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Acupuncture for Seasonal Allergies: Treat & Prevent Spring Allergies Naturally

Monday, May 2nd, 2016 by Sharon Sherman

The sun is shining, the birds are chirping and you – are you blowing your nose? Spring is the time of year for seasonal allergies. As nature starts to bloom and pollen is released into the air, allergy sufferers begin to get the itchy and watery eyes, sneezing, runny nose and sinus pressure that makes […]

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The Holidays are Here. Don’t let this be you.

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015 by Sharon Sherman

With the year winding down, the holiday season has us doing anything but. We’re programmed to spend the next few weeks running around, shopping, wrapping, decorating, cooking, meeting end of year deadlines at work, planning and attending gatherings – leaving our carefully planned routines behind to celebrate the season with friends and family. In December […]

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The Use of Astragalus in Chinese Herbal Medicine

Thursday, November 12th, 2015 by Sharon Sherman

Astragalus (huang qi) is a perennial plant native to China, Mongolia, and Korea, and is one of Chinese medicine’s 50 fundamental herbs. It is considered a strong, qi strengthening remedy, and one of its compounds might even be used to treat HIV in the near future. Though it saw a boost in popularity with the publication […]

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Treat Seasonal Allergy Symptoms with Chinese Medicine Naturally

Wednesday, April 29th, 2015 by Sharon Sherman

After a long, bitterly cold winter, one of the best things to do is get outside and breathe in the sunshine. Unfortunately for many Philadelphians, the warmth of spring comes with a large helping of seasonal allergy symptoms, brought on by increased levels of dust and pollen in the air. According to the American College […]

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How Pinellia (Ban Xia) is Used in Chinese Herbal Medicine

Friday, December 19th, 2014 by Sharon Sherman

Pinellia is a Chinese herb from the Araceae family of flowering plants. It is native to Japan and southern China, and is often called the “green dragon” because of the color and shape of its flower. Pinellia’s long, tongue-like spadix is similar in appearance to the waxy peace lily, an ornamental plant commonly displayed in American homes. […]

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The Use of Eucommia Bark (Du Zhong) in Chinese Medicine

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014 by Sharon Sherman

Eucommia (du zhong) is the bark from the hardy rubber tree, which originated in the Sichuan, Yunnan, Guizhou, and Hubei provinces of central China. It is grown as an ornamental and shade tree, and can reach heights of up to 60 feet in temperate climates. To obtain the bark, small patches are peeled away from mature […]

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